Facts


Amazing Facts About Russia




During the Siege of Leningrad in WWII, 9 Soviet scientists died of starvation while protecting the world's largest seed bank, refusing to eat what they saw as their country's future.

Russia secretly had maps so detailed of the Canadian Arctic during the Cold-War that other ships even now use them over official maps.

25 Russian soldiers under the command of Yakov Pavlov defended a building during the Battle of Stalingrad so well that it never fell. Vasily Chuikov, general of the Soviet forces in Stalingrad, later joked that the Germans lost more men trying to take "Pavlov's house" than they did taking Paris.

In the 1960s at the height of the Cold War, the US continuously flew planes carrying nuclear bombs around the world as a precautionary measure in the event of an attack by the USSR. Five of these planes crashed, and nuclear contamination resulted in at least 2 instances.

From 1979 to 1992 Soviets drilled a super deep bore called the Kola Superdeep Borehole that reached 12,262m (40,230 ft) just to see how deep they could drill.

A Russian woman named Mrs. Vassilyeva in the 1700's gave birth to 16 pairs of twins, 7 sets of triplets and 4 sets of quadruplets in just 40 years with the same man (Feodor Vassilyev).

In WWII, a woman-only Soviet bomber regiment was nicknamed the "Night Witches" by German soldiers. For a successful bombing run, the Witches would cut the engine of their archaic and noisy aircraft. Gliding in, they would release their bombs before the enemy even knew they were there.

USSR liberated more concentration camps than the rest of the allies combined during World War 2.


In 2014, a 3-year old Russian girl named Karina Chikitova survived for 11 days in Siberian taiga forest by drinking water from a creek and eating berries while being protected by her dog, which went to get help after nine days and returned with rescuers.

In 1978, a Russian scientist named Anatoli Bugorski got hit in the head by the proton beam in a particle accelerator and survived to tell the tale.

The German invasion of the Soviet Union caused 95% of all German Army casualties that occurred from 1941 to 1944.

Russia’s Vladimir Putin brought a large dog with him to a round of negotiations with Germany's Angela Merkel, knowing well that she had a pathological fear of dogs in order to gain a psychological edge.

In Soviet Russia, prisoners would get tattoos of Lenin & Stalin, because guards weren’t allowed to shoot at images of national leaders.

80% males born in the Soviet Union in 1923 did not survive World War II.

Alexey Pajitnov, the creator of TETRIS (1984) did not receive any royalties from one of the most popular video game titles until 1996 as the rights were owned by his employer, the Soviet government.

Americans mostly eat white chicken meat and export the rest to Russia/Asia where dark meat is preferred, so most chickens get split in two and sent around the world.

Russia opened a "Military Disneyland" that will allow guests to shoot military grade weapons and try out various military simulators.

Despite John Carter being considered a monumental flop for Disney, it actually broke box office records in Russia.


The United States and Russia signed a treaty in 1967 agreeing not to nuke the Moon.

The Soviets made "The Hobbit" movie in 1985 with the full name "The Fairytale Journey of Mr. Bilbo Baggins, The Hobbit." The full movie is available on Youtube.

The physical document that dissolved the Soviet Union is missing as of February 7, 2013.

In the 1940s, Russians scientists performed experiments on animal organs and tissues and they actually succeeded to bring back to life a severed head of a dog. The dogs’ head even reacted to light, smell, and sound and it even tried to bark.

The U.S. purchased Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million, which, when adjusted for inflation, is $118 million. Nearly $2.5 million less than what Real Madrid paid for Cristiano Ronaldo.

There is an abandoned Russian cruise ship (Lyubov Orlova) roaming international waters since January 2013.

Russia has a monument to laboratory mice, to celebrate their contribution to science.

The first animal launched into orbit, Laika, was found as a stray wandering the streets of Moscow. Soviet scientists assumed that such animals had already learned to endure conditions of extreme cold and hunger.

In 1980, Swedish Navy detected underwater sounds that they suspected to be hostile Russian submarines. This suspicion escalated to a diplomatic conflict between Sweden and Russia. It was later found by a researcher that these sounds came from fish farts and he won Ig Nobel Prize (American parody of the Nobel Prizes) for this discovery.

California makes the same amount of money as Italy every year, and that Texas makes as much as Russia.



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