Quotes


Best Aristotle Quotes




There is no great genius without some touch of madness.

In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true friends are a sure refuge. The young they keep out of mischief; to the old they are a comfort and aid in their weakness, and those in the prime of life they incite to noble deeds.

Friendship is essentially a partnership.

Suffering becomes beautiful when anyone bears great calamities with cheerfulness, not through insensibility but through greatness of mind.

The moral virtues, then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.

It is Homer who has chiefly taught other poets the art of telling lies skillfully.

The virtue of justice consists in moderation, as regulated by wisdom.

Youth is easily deceived because it is quick to hope.

My best friend is the man who in wishing me well wishes it for my sake.

Both oligarch and tyrant mistrust the people, and therefore deprive them of their arms.

In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.


Thou wilt find rest from vain fancies if thou doest every act in life as though it were thy last.

The greatest virtues are those which are most useful to other persons.

Plato is dear to me, but dearer still is truth.

The one exclusive sign of thorough knowledge is the power of teaching.

Poetry is finer and more philosophical than history; for poetry expresses the universal, and history only the particular.

The aim of the wise is not to secure pleasure, but to avoid pain.

Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.

If one way be better than another, that you may be sure is nature's way.

Therefore, the good of man must be the end of the science of politics.

Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well.

The law is reason, free from passion.


A statement is persuasive and credible either because it is directly self-evident or because it appears to be proved from other statements that are so.

Our judgments when we are pleased and friendly are not the same as when we are pained and hostile.

Persuasion is achieved by the speaker's personal character when the speech is so spoken as to make us think him credible. We believe good men more fully and more readily than others: this is true generally whatever the question is, and absolutely true where exact certainty is impossible and opinions are divided.

Whether if soul did not exist time would exist or not, is a question that may fairly be asked; for if there cannot be someone to count there cannot be anything that can be counted, so that evidently there cannot be number; for number is either what has been, or what can be, counted.

Excellence, then, is a state concerned with choice, lying in a mean, relative to us, this being determined by reason and in the way in which the man of practical wisdom would determine it.

Temperance is a mean with regard to pleasures.

Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and choice, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim.

Perfect friendship is the friendship of men who are good, and alike in excellence; for these wish well alike to each other qua good, and they are good in themselves.

Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions.

Good habits formed at youth make all the difference.

Courage is a mean with regard to fear and confidence.

All men by nature desire knowledge.

Even when laws have been written down, they ought not always to remain unaltered.

Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.

He who hath many friends hath none.

Those that know, do. Those that understand, teach.


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