Facts


Interesting Facts About Switzerland




Switzerland, which is often praised as a model for direct democracy, did not grant women the right to vote in any of the elections until 1990.

The German township of Büsingen am Hochrhein is entirely surrounded by Switzerland.

Switzerland is abbreviated to ‘CH’ because of its Latin name, ‘Confoederatio Helvetica.’

Switzerland claimed neutrality during WW2 and therefore thousands of people deposited their hard-earned money in Switzerland. When the depositors died, the relatives were denied any access to their funds, funds that the banks continued to make interest off. They also funneled hundreds of millions into Nazi Germany.

In Switzerland, it is illegal to deny that the holocaust happened.

There is a giant three-legged chair in Geneva, Switzerland dedicated to the opposition of use of landmines.

There has been an ongoing research in Switzerland about using LSD to alleviate end of life anxiety for terminally ill cancer patients coping with their impending deaths. The preliminary results from the study are being deemed “promising”.

Switzerland is unique for having enough nuclear fallout shelters to accommodate its entire human population.


The country of Liechtenstein is so small that in 2007, Swiss troops accidentally invaded it after getting lost in a rainstorm.

Switzerland has no single Head of State. It instead has a seven-member executive council, which serves as the Swiss collective head of state.

The average salary of a teacher in Switzerland in 2010 was $112000 per year.

Charlie Chaplin’s corpse was stolen by a small group of Swiss mechanics in an attempt to extort money from Chaplin’- Source family. After retrieving his body, he was reburied under 6 feet (1.8 m) of concrete to prevent further attempts.

About 56% of Electricity generated in Switzerland is from hydroelectricity and another 39% from nuclear power, resulting in a nearly CO2-free electricity-generating network.

A Swiss Jeweler made a $68 million ring that was made entirely out of diamond.

Amongst industrialized nations, Switzerland has one of the highest rates of gun ownership, but has nearly half the rate of gun-related deaths that the United States has.

The BBC pulled an April Fools prank, duping hundreds of thousands of individuals into thinking spaghetti was annually harvested from “spaghetti trees” in Switzerland.

In Switzerland, it is illegal to keep just one guinea pig. You got to have them in pairs.

There was a war in Switzerland in 1802 called Stecklikrieg that was fought out with wooden clubs because Napoleon took away their weapons.

One of Switzerland’s main defense strategies is to demolish every main access into the country via roads, bridges, and railways. There are at least 3,000 locations currently prepared to blow at a moment’s notice in case of an attack.

The Swiss Army Knife’s corkscrew tool is not made in Switzerland, but in Japan. All other parts are pure Swiss-made.

There is a political party in Switzerland, called the “Anti Powerpoint Party”. It works towards decreasing the use of Powerpoint in professional presentations.


Men in Switzerland are required to keep the firearms they are issued during their military service at home even after they leave the military to prevent any home break ins and to have the countries men ready to mobilize in the event of a threat.

The Swiss version of Santa Claus is normally accompanied by a very strange-looking individual with a blacked out face, whose job is to beat naughty children with sticks. The guy’s name is “Schmutzli”, which roughly translates to “Dirty”.

In Switzerland, a group of citizens may challenge a law passed by Parliament, if they are able to gather 50,000 signatures against the law within 100 days. A national vote is scheduled where voters decide by a simple majority whether to accept or reject the law.

The Swiss military keeps fully stocked artillery bunkers, disguised as quaint country homes, in the middle of populated villages.

Assisted suicide is legal in Switzerland. It is also legal in Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands, and three American states (Oregon, Washington, and Montana).

The first ever youth hostel, established to protect the travelers from bandits, has been operating in the Swiss Alps for nearly 1,200 years.

There is a 500-year-old statue of a man eating a sack of babies in Bern, Switzerland, and nobody is sure why.

Dalai Lama owns the smallest vineyard in the world, which is located in Switzerland. It consists of only three vines and has an area of 1.67 meters squared.

A lawyer in Switzerland represents animals in court. He has even prosecuted a fisherman for taking too long to catch a Pike.


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